Gaming History

Glasshouse Capacity Services Society

Gaming History Report – Draft May 17 2016

As this document progresses we will update (You Can Download the Document HERE)


Gaming History – the Criminal Code of Canada

In order to discuss and understand the current issues facing non-profits in BC it is necessary to go back and understand how we got to this place.

At one time the Federal government regulated Gaming in Canada as is their responsibility under the Canadian constitution.

Gaming was a core fundraising vehicle for many charities and religious groups who held bingos raffles and casino nights for the entertainment and the good of the community.  The funding was essential to many core services and charitable endeavors in the community. The way in which charities disbursed the gaming funds was per their incorporation and charitable mandate and mission regulations and under the direction of  community boards.

There was horse racing and fairs and exhibitions that were also licenced by the federal government under the minister of agriculture.

The link below to the report published in the Osgoode Hall Law Journal  in 1988 “The legal Recent Amendments to Canadian Lottery and Gaming Laws: The Transfer of Power between Federal and Provincial Governments” by Judith a. Osborne and Colin S. Campbell  challenges the legality of the transfer of the federal government’s power to the provincial government with respect to gaming.

The report notes that little if any public consultation was done around changes to the criminal code to allow the transfer. Full report available at the link below, and worth reading.

http://digitalcommons.osgoode.yorku.ca/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1825&context=ohlj

We Quote the abstract here at the beginning of the report, as follows:

“Abstract

 Through an examination of recent amendments to the lottery and gaming provisions of the Criminal Code and of the law reform process involved in those amendments, this article demonstrates the unique structure of Canadian gaming laws and challenges the constitutional validity of provincial regulation as an interdelegation of power.”

The federal Criminal code sections- Criminal Code – Gaming and Betting 200, 202,204,205,206,207,208,209

Link to criminal code:

http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-46/page-49.html#docCont

An excerpt here of the criminal code which says that all the forms of gambling are illegal with the stated exceptions. There were changes made to the criminal code to allow provinces to enter into gaming.

207 (1) Notwithstanding any of the provisions of this Part relating to gaming and betting, it is lawful

  • (a)for the government of a province, either alone or in conjunction with the government of another province, to conduct and manage a lottery scheme in that province, or in that and the other province, in accordance with any law enacted by the legislature of that province;
  • (b)for a charitable or religious organization, pursuant to a licence issued by the Lieutenant Governor in Council of a province or by such other person or authority in the province as may be specified by the Lieutenant Governor in Council thereof, to conduct and manage a lottery scheme in that province if the proceeds from the lottery scheme are used for a charitable or religious object or purpose;”

A View from Ontario

The Alcohol & Gaming Commission of Ontario Annual Report 14/15 included the following information

“LEGAL FRAMEWORK – GAMING Criminal Code of Canada The Criminal Code of Canada (the Code) establishes what types of gaming activities are legal, and the provinces are assigned responsibility for operating, licensing and regulating legal forms of gaming. Part VII of the Code prohibits gaming in general, while Section 207 (1) allows for a number of exceptions to the general prohibition. Specifically, it permits lottery schemes provided that they are: • Conducted and managed by the province or by an agent of the Province, which in Ontario is the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation; • Conducted and managed by a licensed charitable or religious organization provided that the proceeds of the lottery scheme are used for a charitable or religious purpose; and • Conducted and managed by a licensed board of a fair or exhibition or by an operator of a concession leased by that board or by a person at a public place of amusement where the prizes and wagers are limited to small amounts set out in the Code. “Lottery schemes” are broadly defined under the Code but exclude a number of specific schemes, including single sports events, thereby making betting or wagering on such schemes illegal in Canada, and pari-mutuel betting on races, which is permitted for horse racing elsewhere in the Code. The definition also effectively reserves the conduct and management of lottery schemes using electronic devices or computers to the Provinces or their agents, subject to a recently exception. In December 2014, the Code was amended to allow the use of computers for the sale of a ticket, selection of a winner or the distribution of a prize in a raffle, including a 50/50 draw, if the raffle is conducted and managed by a charitable or religious organization in accordance with other requirements in the Code. In consultation with stakeholders, the AGCO will be developing standards and requirements in respect of the use of computers for raffles. (Sec. 207(4)). Gaming Control Act, 1992 The Gaming Control Act, 1992 (GCA) provides for the regulation of gaming operations, suppliers and gaming assistants/employees of casinos, slot machine facilities, charitable gaming events, and registration of OLG lottery retailers, lottery retailer managers, and lottery suppliers. Ontario Regulation 78/12 applies to all the gaming sectors under the AGCO’s responsibility (i.e. charitable gaming, casinos, slot machine facilities and lotteries conducted and managed by the OLG, as well as the new internet and electronic charitable gaming products that are being developed by OLG).”

The document prepared by the Law commission of Canada called “the legalization of Gambling in Canada” is available at the link below. Our excerpt from the executive summary as follows:

Canadian criminal law in regard to gambling has been used principally to consolidate and legitimize a provincial government monopoly over gambling as a revenue generating instrument. This, of course, begs the fundamental question of whether or not this is an appropriate use of criminal law

Link: http://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2008/lcc-cdc/JL2-64-2005E.pdf

Another short read regarding history of gambling is the following link from the University of Calgary but uses BC as the study:

http://prism.ucalgary.ca/bitstream/1880/315/2/Non_Profits_and_Gambling_Expansion.pdf 

The growth of Gaming in BC is demonstrated by one company perhaps the largest player as follows:

History – Great Canadian Gaming Corporation

1982 – Great Canadian Casino Company Ltd. Is formed and begins operating temporary charity casinos in a variety of locations, often training staff on-site, and operates the PNE’s casino and midway games at the annual fair.

1986 Great Canadian opens its first permanent location, The Casino at the Holiday Inn on Broadway in Vancouver on February 21, 1986.

Great Canadian Casino opens Nanaimo Casino, The first permanent casino on Vancouver Island in the summer.

1987 Great Canadian Casino hires it’s first employees May 1, 1987. BC Gaming Commission is formed. The red lion Casino opens in Victoria. The Richmond Casino opens. The Langley Casino Opens.

1988 – The Guildford Casino Opens

1992 – The Mayfair Casino Opens, The Langley Casino Closes.

1994 –  The Renaissance Casino in Vancouver opens. The Guildford Casino Closes transferring its license to the Newton Casino.

1997 – Gamin gin BC is Expanded to include longer hours, a wider variety of table games, and for the first time – slot machines. Great Canadian Gaming Corporation was created March 15, 1997. Great Canadian Casinos Inc. was incorporated July 1997.

1998- the Charity casino system is replaced and BC lottery Corporation assumes oversight of all casinos in the province.

1999 The Red Lion Casino in Victoria closes. The Nanaimo Casino is relocated.

2000 – no smoking in BC casinos as of January 01, 2000.

2001 – at Canadian opens two new properties in BC, View Royal Casino in Victoria and Coquitlam Casino in Coquitlam. Mayfair Casino in Victoria closes December 2001. Newton Casino in Surrey closes November 2001.

2004 – Great Canadian trades on the Toronto Stock Exchange. Great Canadian opens River Rock Resort in Richmond, establishing a new standard for entertainment in BC. The Company also enters the horseracing industry, acquiring the historic Hastings Racecourse in Vancouver. Great Canadian acquires Bear Mountain Community Gaming Centre in Dawson Creek. Great Canadian Acquires 100% control of Great American Gaming Corporation and their 4 Casinos in Tukwila, Everett, Kent, And Lakewood in Washington state. The Richmond Casino and the Renaissance Casino close transferring licenses and operations to River Rock Casino Resort.

2005 – Great Canadian Expands across the country, acquiring Casino Nova Scotia with two properties in Halifax an Sydney; and two racetracks in Ontario, Georgian Downs and Flamboro Downs. IN BC, Great Canadian Acquires Fraser Downs Racetrack & Casino in Cloverdale. River Rock Casino Resort expands, adding a four diamond hotel of two towers and 1000 seat show theatre. The Coquitlam Casino completes a significant redevelopment, becoming Boulevard Casino and nearly tripling in size.

2006 – Bear Mountain Community Gaming Centre relocates to a new location and becomes Chances Dawson Creek Community Gaming Centre.

2007 – In conjunction with the closure of the Casino at the Holiday Inn on Broadway. Fraser Downs Racetrack & Casino adds table games to its gaming options.

2008 – Great Canadian acquires Haney BingoPlex in Maple Ridge, BC. Great Canadian completes the redevelopment o Hastings Racecourse, adding a 600 slot permanent gaming facility.

2009 – River rock Casino Resort welcomes the Canada Line, Vancouver’s newest mass transit system, and completes extensive enhancement including Canada’s only curved escalators, Georgian Downs adds gaming capacity. View Royal Casino Expands adding a parkade and additional gaming space.

2010 – Haney Bingo Plex expands with the addition of 100 slot machines becoming Maple Ridge Community Gaming Centre following a renovation, Casino Nanaimo rebrands.

2011 Great Canadian expands River Rock Casino Resort adding a third, four diamond, hotel tower.

2012 – Chilliwack Bingo relocates to a new location and becomes Chances Chilliwack.  Fraser Downs Racetrack & Casino opens their Poker Room in Surrey, BC.

2013 – Canada’s one and only Hard Rock Casino Vancouver opened its doors on December 20, 2013, following a multi-million dollar renovation and rebranding of the Boulevard Casino.  Maple Ridge Community Gaming Centre relocates to a beautiful new location and becomes Chances Maple Ridge.

2014- On December 20th,

2014 Hard Rock Casino Vancouver celebrates and marks its one year anniversary River Rock Casino Resort has a lot to be proud of, as the property celebrates its Diamond Anniversary commemorating the opening of a one-of-kind entertainment destination that has forever changed the gaming experience in British Columbia 

2015-Fraser Downs Racetrack and Casino to undergo a multi- million Dollar Renovation

Great Canadian introduces Shorelines Casino brand to Ontario for the gaming properties at Thousand Island, Kawartha Downs, and potentially, in the City of Belleville. New table games, slots, dining features await guests at unveiling of Elements Casino December 17th, 2015 following a multi-million dollar renovation 

Trouble in River City

I recall in the 80’s when charities had to supply volunteers to go to casinos and participate in a cursory way in order for it to be legal to operate. It was like going to the wine makers and stirring the wine because by law you were making the wine. The casino could not operate or even open without the volunteers. We worked the casino night with jobs like cashiers and we collected the proceeds from that nights earnings.  Then without discussion all of a sudden it changed and the government was going to pool the earnings and give grants to the non-profits but you had to apply and make your case hat in hand, the world was changing, a pattern was emerging.

It was then that an uprising of community organizations across the province mounted a campaign  and the result was the formation of the BC Association for Charitable Gaming and a letter of understanding between the government and representatives of the non-profit sector. At the time Bingo operations were a large part of the gaming pie, charities were against VLT’s in Gaming halls as it was predicted that VLTS would cause bingo revenue to go down, and the prediction turned out to be true. The once popular bingo evenings that many enjoyed and earned money for community groups has been replace by other forms of gambling.

Gaming

I remember clearly when Gaming expansion by the BC government proposed Break open tickets. The program to expand into break open tickets was sold to the public (as usual) on the social contract that charities and communities would benefit. Charities and non-profits were offered an opportunity to benefit from the sale of break open tickets, all they had to do was market the program. We accepted the challenge, we hired people, we bought break open dispensing machines, we leased break open machines, we built processes and administrative functions we spent millions upon millions investing in the program. The organization I was CFO with had invested about one half million just in machines and had 7 people on staff working on the project. Of course this program was only for those groups who could afford such an investment. The majority of the small non-profits could not compete, and this fact was one the provincial government was very much aware.. We were set up in a very nasty way. The program had barely got off the ground and the Provincial government announced that they were taking the program back citing that  it wasn’t an equal playing field for all groups. They offered us nothing accept depreciated value of our machines that hung on walls across the province. We of course fought, and won only a lease takeover agreement, a payment for depreciated machines and 6 months projected revenue. The pubs and establishments were promised a larger percentage of the revenue and of course the government got the rest and charities got nothing.

The Numbers

We prepared a worksheet of the gaming revenues and how they are disbursed in BC on the next page

In the recent years The BC Government has tried with some success to eliminate some  subsectors of the non-profit community, adult arts and culture, heritage, environment. Valiant efforts by some groups opposition gained some ground. Alliances formed with cities and municipalities to halt gaming expansion seemed to get government attention.  However when the dust settled in 2011 the revenue dropped from 160.1 Million to 135.0 Million and ever since that time the grant amount remained the same while other recipients of gaming funds  are growing. Let’s take a close look at the worksheet. Just prior to 2005 the amount  was determined by a percentage and it was 33%. There was a letter to the BCGCA committing to that percentage of the Casino and Community Gaming which included bingos and raffles. The letter follows the worksheet on the next page and is part of the City of Vancouver Administrative Report that discusses the Policy agreement between the Provincial Government and the UBCM Union of BC Municipalities. The UBCM was supportive of the community Groups entitlement to gaming proceeds.

The Worksheet on the next page shows that from 2005 to 2014 the net Gaming revenues in total  grew 43% but the “Casino and community Gaming” Revenues grew 63%. The non-profit share is based on percentages of the “Casino and Community Gaming”  Revenue and while this has increased 63% the non-profit share has decreased from 25% to 16%. The plateauing of the non-profit share while total revenues grow result in the percentage drop for non-profits each year.

In 2005 there were 6800 grants to community groups in 2014 only 5000 groups were funded. There are more applications each year adding pressure to the government to find a granting process that will eliminate enough groups to fit the capped revenue of 135 million.

Horse Racing Purse Enhancements received a total of 69 Million over the 10 years on the chart below, this is a subsidy to for-profit entities like Great Canadian Casino. The question needs to be asked why they cannot invest in their own business with the millions they make and make it profitable.  While charities and non-profits are struggling the province is allocating funds to billion dollar corporations. I’m not sure that the Canadian criminal code allowed for that.

review of historical gaming

 

agendacity of vancouver

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORT

Date: June 29, 1999
Author/Local: Mario Lee/6034
RTS No. 839
CC File No. 2633

Council: July 6, 1999

TO: Vancouver City Council
FROM: Director of Community Services, Social Planning, in consultation with the Director of Legal Services
SUBJECT: Gaming Policy Agreement
INFORMATION

THAT Council receive this report for information.

GENERAL MANAGER’S COMMENTS

The General Manager of Community Services presents this report for information only.

COUNCIL POLICY

  • On January 27, 1987, Council asked the Attorney-General to begin a review of the regulations governing the operation of casinos as soon as possible, and that the City, and other concerned groups and individuals be given the opportunity to express in detail their concerns and suggestions for improvements. Council also expressed its concern that revisions to casino gambling regulations adhere to basic principles including that the maximum financial benefits accrue directly to the social service agencies sponsoring the events; and that appropriate, strict controls be in place to discourage or prevent possible negative social consequences, such as compulsive gambling or criminal activity.
  • On July 26, 1994, Council requested that the Provincial government ensure that there will be municipal participation in the evaluation of community impacts for any expansion to gaming activity, including video lottery terminals, gaming on First Nations lands and major casinos. Council further requested that gaming legislation or regulations include municipal endorsement of specific gaming

locations prior to approval, and that approval of any new gaming activity be conditional on a portion of the revenue being available to local government for mitigation measures.

  • On November 1st, 1994, Council passed a resolution opposing gaming expansion including the introduction of video lottery terminals (VLTs) and, that the City of Vancouver considered gaming expansion a matter of determination by the people of British Columbia through appropriate broad and local involvement in a meaningful consultation program.
  • On March 25, 1997, Council reiterated its demand to the Provincial Government for a comprehensive Gaming Act before expanded gaming activity goes forward. Council further advised the Minister of Municipal Affairs and the Minister of Employment and Investment that Vancouver opposes the addition of slot machines as an expanded gaming option.
  • On October 7, 1997, Council adopted amendments to the Zoning and Development By-law to permit a limited number of charity-operated casinos in certain areas of the city and to prohibit casinos with slot machines.
  • On March 9, 1999, Council responded to the Provincial White Paper on Gaming, reiterating its stand on the preservation of municipal powers on issues surrounding gambling expansion.

PURPOSE AND SUMMARY

The purpose of this report is to inform Council about the Memorandum of Agreement on Gaming Policy between the Union of British Columbia Municipalities (UBCM) and the Provincial Government, signed on June 17th, 1999. This report briefly analyses the implications to the City of Vancouver arising from this agreement.

BACKGROUND AND DISCUSSION

On February 2, 1999, the Provincial Government released the “Report on Gaming Legislation and Regulation in British Columbia”, containing the White Paper on Gaming and a proposed “Gaming Control Act”.

The Provincial report provided background on the legal framework for gaming, government policy on gaming, social and enforcement issues, as well as draft legislation. The proposed legislation would have had a very significant impact on municipalities, such as eliminating the City’s ability to control the expansion and relocation of Vancouver’s five existing casinos and allowing for the addition of slot machines.

On March 9, 1999, Council responded to the provincial government. The City’s response to the Minister in charge of gaming had six components:

  • Municipal Jurisdiction
    · Social Implications
    · Economic Implications
    · Implications to Charities
    · Policing Implications
    · Public Meetings and Public Comments

The UBCM responded on April 15, 1999. The UBCM response raised similar issues and concerns to those raised by the City of Vancouver.

Memorandum of Agreement on Gaming Policy

On June 17th, 1999, upon having reviewed the more than 150 submissions commenting on the White Paper on Gaming, the provincial government agreed to sign a Memorandum of Agreement between the Province and UBCM (Appendix A).

Memorandums of Agreement were also signed with the B.C. Association for Charitable Gaming (BCACG) and the Charitable Bingo Association Committee of the Bingo Council of B.C. (Appendix B).

The Memorandum of Agreement on Gaming Policy between the Province and UBCM, lays out a series of principles that will govern the relationship between the Province and UBCM with respect to gaming issues, until gaming legislation is introduced. Some of the highlights are:

  • The Province affirms the jurisdiction of local governments, specifically with respect to their land-use and by-law making powers.
  • The Province affirms the ability of local governments to make decisions as to whether new facilities or re-located facilities will be permitted within their boundaries.
  • The Province affirms the ability of local governments to direct and define the extent, scope and type of casino and bingo gaming permitted within their boundaries, including the acceptance or rejection of slot machines.
  • The Province will share gaming revenue with local governments as set out in the White Paper. In Vancouver, this means 10% of the net income from local casinos.
  • The Province will consult in a meaningful way with local government regarding the form and content of gaming legislation before it is introduced into the Legislature.
  • The UBCM intends to actively work with the Province in the development of comprehensive gaming legislation.

This Agreement clearly satisfies many of the concerns expressed by Vancouver City Council in its response to the provincial White Paper on Gaming. Traditional municipal powers over land use and by-law making have been supported.

Charities

The provincial government signed another Memorandum of Agreement on Gaming Policy with two charity organizations, namely, the B.C. Association for Charitable Gaming and the Charitable Bingo Association Committee of the Bingo Council of B.C.

Some of the highlights of the agreement with charities are:

  • The Province affirms the role of licensed charities as the sole beneficiaries of bingo gaming, including both paper and electronic bingo;
    · The Province will pursue changes to the gaming provisions of the federal Criminal Codeto facilitate bingo charities having exclusive domain over all bingo activities;
    · The province reaffirm its commitment to the existing charity guarantee of a minimum of $125 million annually;
    · The Province affirms that the “public foundation” licencing model recommended in the White Paper will not be pursued.

This agreement satisfies most of the charities’ concerns with the changes proposed in the White Paper on Gaming. One of the outstanding concerns from some of the bingo halls relates to their ability to sustain their customer base considering that casinos with slot machines attract many of the same customers. At present there are two casinos with slots, one in Burnaby, one in New Westminster and a third one (river boat) to be open in New Westminster in September, 1999.

Existing Vancouver casinos

The announced agreement has satisfied most of the City’s demands. Casino operators, however, are not satisfied. Casino operators have wanted an even playing field for all casino operations, independent of their location. Many casino operators feel that this announcement leaves the five Vancouver based casinos in a position of disadvantage. Casinos in other jurisdictions such as Burnaby and New Westminster enjoy a full complement of casino games, including slot machines, while Vancouver based casinos don’t have slot machines.

It is possible that some of the Vancouver casinos may seek relocation in municipalities that will accept slot machines. From the perspective of casino operators, however, this doesn’t deal with the fact that a good portion of the Lower Mainland casino customers reside in the City of Vancouver, and that market considerations may not permit for all of them to relocate to other municipalities. Many of the casino operators have also incurred in significant capital investments in their facilities, even though they have known Council’s policies regarding expansion, all along.

Staff anticipate requests from existing Vancouver-based casinos to relocate within the City of Vancouver.

The five existing casinos in Vancouver employ about 1,000 employees with an annual payroll of around $25 Million. It is not known how many of those employees reside in the city of Vancouver, and whether any reduction in employment in Vancouver will be absorbed by job enhancements in casinos elsewhere in the region.

Revenue Sharing

With respect to the share of gaming revenue, the White Paper on Gaming (page 223) indicates that the 10% of the net earnings from the casino operations within the City’s jurisdiction, will be paid on an automatic and ongoing basis, effective April 1, 1999. Payments should be made quarterly, in arrears, and a fiscal year-end reconciliation should be provided to each local government. The share of the revenue will be paid to the benefit of the host local community and under the Memorandum of Agreement between the Province and the UBCM, without requiring the adoption of a Council resolution.

We are not certain yet about the exact amount of the City’s share of gaming revenue. During the 1998/99 fiscal year, the City’s share would have amounted to approximately $5 Million dollars. However, casino revenue from Vancouver’s casinos is going down as customers go to casinos with slot machines in adjacent municipalities. It is anticipated that the Province will officially inform the City on the exact amount to be distributed in the near future.

CONCLUSION

As a result of City Council’s persistent assertion of its right to control gaming in Vancouver -a position that was then taken by UBCM – the provincial government has finally recognized the historical municipal powers to regulate gaming facilities within their boundaries. Staff will continue to work with UBCM, charity organizations and industry representatives in order to assess any future developments.

– – – – –

This document dated for reference the 17th day of June 1999.

Memorandum of Agreement
On Gaming Policy

Between:

The Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM)

-and-

The Government of British Columbia (the Province)

The Province and UBCM have agreed to govern their relationship with respect to gaming issues according to the following principles:

The Province:

  • affirms the jurisdiction of local governments, specifically with respect to their land-use and by-law making powers;
  • affirms the ability of local governments to make decisions as to whether new facilities or re-located facilities will be permitted within their boundaries;
  • affirms local government’s ability to direct and define the extent, scope and type of casino and bingo gaming within their boundaries. It also affirms the ability of local government to decide whether slot machines or other similar devices could be placed within their boundaries;
  • will provide an independent and transparent selection process for new and re-located gaming facilities;
  • will share gaming revenue with local governments as set out in the White Paper;
  • will share gaming revenue with local governments that host gaming facilities, regardless of their stated opposition to gaming, and without the adoption of a Council/Board resolution;
  • will consult in a meaningful way with local government in the development of gaming policy changes that may affect local governments;
  • will consult in a meaningful way with local governments regarding the form and content of gaming legislation before it is introduced into the Legislature;
  • will ensure that charities are guaranteed an ongoing source of revenue from gaming and that eligibility rules for this funding will be maintained;
  • will ensure there is a legislative mechanism for consultation / mediation with adjacent communities; and
  • reaffirms its commitment that video lottery terminals will not be permitted in British Columbia.

The UBCM intends to:

  • actively and cooperatively work with the Province in the development of comprehensive gaming legislation.

The Province and UBCM intend to:

  • bring resolution to existing and future disputes through negotiations, where possible, and in a manner consistent with the principles of this Agreement.

These principles will govern the parties’ actions with respect to gaming henceforth, and until legislation consistent with these principles is passed in the Legislature.

___________________ _____________________________
John Ranta Honourable Jenny Kwan
President of UBCM Minister of Municipal Affairs
This document dated for reference the 17th day of June 1999. 

Memorandum of Agreement
On Gaming Policy

Between:

The B.C. Association for Charitable Gaming (BCACG)

The Charitable Bingo Association Committee of the Bingo Council of B.C.
(Signed on June 18th, 1999)

-and-

The Government of British Columbia (the Province)

The Province and the BCACG (and the Charitable Bingo Association Committee) have agreed to govern their relationship with respect to gaming issues according to the following principles:

The Province:

  • affirms the role of licenced charities as the sole beneficiaries of bingo gaming, including both paper and electronic bingo;
  • affirms that charities have exclusive domain over all bingo activities, subject to licencing by the Gaming Commission, and subject to the provisions of the federal Criminal Code;
  • will pursue changes to the gaming provisions of the federal Criminal Code to provide greater legal certainty for the continuing key role of licenced charities in charitable gaming;
  • will pursue changes to the gaming provisions of the federal Criminal Code to permit the broad use of technology in bingo by licenced charities, so that licenced charities can have exclusive domain over all bingo activities;
  • reaffirms its commitment to the existing charitable guarantee of a minimum $125 million annually, indexed annually at the rate of Vancouver CPI, with a formula that ensures charity entitlement to an amount, after accounting for retained bingo revenues, equal to 1/3 of ongoing government net community casino gaming revenue;
  • affirms that the existing bingo facility-level guarantee will remain in effect for an interim period to be determined by the Gaming Commission in meaningful consultation with licenced bingo charities;
  • affirms that the British Columbia Gaming Commission is the sole licencing authority for charitable gaming;
  • affirms that the “public foundation” licencing model recommended in the White Paper will not be pursued;
  • will consult in a meaningful way with charities in the development of gaming policy changes that may affect charities;
  • will consult in a meaningful way with charities regarding the form and content of gaming legislation before it is introduced into the Legislature; and
  • reaffirms its commitment that video lottery terminals will not be permitted in British Columbia.

The BCACG (and the Charitable Bingo Association Committee) intends to:

  • actively and cooperatively work with the Province, in the development of comprehensive gaming legislation.
    · Actively and cooperatively work with the Province in the support of negotiations with the federal government to achieve changes to the gaming provisions of the federal Criminal Codeas contemplated in bullets three and four on the previous page.

The Province and BCACG (and the Charitable Bingo Association Committee) intend to:

  • bring resolution to existing and future disputes through negotiations, where possible, and in a manner consistent with the principles of this Agreement.

These principles will govern the parties’ actions with respect to gaming henceforth, and until legislation consistent with these principles is passed in the Legislature.

___________________ _____________________________
Robert MacInnes Mike Farnworth
President of BCACG Minister of Employment and Investment
Frank Garnish
Chair, Charitable Bingo Association Committee
Bingo Council of B.C.